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CIBEL Lunch Seminar: The latest development in China’s specialized intellectual property court system

29 November 2019
12:30pm - 2:00pm
UNSW Law Boardroom (Room 206), Level 2, UNSW Law, Sydney NSW 2052
CIBEL

Herbert Smith Freehills China International Business and Economic Law (CIBEL) Centre invites you to attend CIBEL Lunch Seminar "The latest development in China’s specialized intellectual property court system" given by Professor Mingde Li on 29th November.

Abstract

China established its modern intellectual property system in 1978 and has followed a trend of special trial of intellectual property cases. In this respect, China established the special intellectual property tribunals in the Supreme Court, High Courts, some intermediate courts, and basic courts.
 
On the basis of the special tribunals, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress passed a decision in August 2014 to establish three intellectual property courts in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou. Up to October 2019, in addition to three intellectual property courts, 21 intellectual property courts have been established under the approval of the Supreme Court. These courts have trans-regional jurisdiction on the first instance cases concerning patent, plant variety, layout-design, technical secret, and computer program. 

In October 2018, the Standing Commission of National People’s Congress made another decision to establish an intellectual property trial court in the Supreme Court to hear appeal cases from the 3 and 21 intellectual property courts. Thus China has established a special judicial system concerning the cases of patent, plant variety, layout-design, technical secret, and computer program. 

This lecture will discuss the latest development in China’s specialized intellectual property system, and the problems that shall be resolved in the near future. 

 

Registrations close on 22 November.

Register Here

Speakers
Professor Li

Professor Mingde Li

Professor Mingde Li graduated from Peking University with Bachelor, Master and PhD degrees. From January 1995 to January 1997, he was a visiting scholar in the School of Law, the University of Washington in Seattle, United States. From February to August 2001, he was a guest researcher in Max-Planck Institute for Intellectual Property, Competition, and Tax Law in Munich, Germany. From October 2006 to February 2007, he was an invited international guest researcher in the Institute of Intellectual Property of Japan.